700 000€ par an en jouant à League Of Legends, c’est possible !

Si l'esport (sport électronique) est une discipline encore relativement jeune, il brasse déjà des sommes colossales, et les meilleurs joueurs peuvent gagner des sommes astronomiques. Carlos "Ocelote" Rodriguez, par exemple, excelle à League Of Legends, ce qui lui a permis de gagner pas loin de 700 000€ en un an.

Les amateurs d’esport, et plus particulièrement de LOL, connaissent très certainement Carlos « Ocelote » Rodriguez, membre de l’équipe européenne professionnelle SK. Il est doué, très doué, mais encore loin des meilleurs du monde. Et pourtant, il a récemment déclaré avoir gagné presque 700 000€ en un an.

Pas la totalité en monnaie sonnante et trébuchante, certes, mais tout de même. Gains de compétition, merchandising, sponsoring, la liste est longue tant « Ocelote » a su faire fructifier sa « propre marque ». Impressionnant, non ?

Tags :Sources :Kotaku
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  1. Au lieu de reprendre bêtement reddit/kotaku , il faudrait préciser que 70% de ces revenus sont dues au marketing de marques autour de lui

    « between his team’s salary, marketing contract, prices, streaming his matches and all the merchandising he has started selling at oceloteworld.net. »

    « Traditionally, the biggest salaries have been done in South Korea” tells Mesonero “where we can find annual earnings of over 200.000 dollars, although there have been even bigger cases. In the US, the salaries of the best players are around 80.000 and 160.000 dollars. In Europe quantities are smaller, between 50.000 and 70.000 euros as an annual average. And in Spain the best payed are between 20.000 and 40.000 euros. But on these figures marketing and tournament prices are not included, which in general are bigger”.

    en gros Corée +~200.000 €, EU entre 50.000€ et 70.000€ USA 80.000 $ à 160.000$ de SALAIRE , à ça venez rajouter les prix et tout le merchandising qu’il y a derrière

      1. c’est tiré de la source d’origine -> http://www.abc.es/tecnologia/videojuegos/20131021/abci-ocelote-jugadores-profesionales-videojuegos-201310181445.html

        traduite en anglais

        Carlos Rodríguez was 10 years old when he saw for the first time his father playing at the computer. He was amazed by it, without imaging that a few years later, that hobby would be a whole lifestyle where he could earn his living professionally. And not only that, but create a whole empire around him and earn, at his 23 years, around 600.000 and 700.000 euros annually, between his team’s salary, marketing contract, prices, streaming his matches and all the merchandising he has started selling at oceloteworld.net. “It’s crazy” he assures ABC, still amazed by what is happening to him.

        The story of this boy from Madrid started not so different from all the other kids that spend hours and hours in front of the computer, absorbed in games like FIFA, Call of Duty, World of Warcraft, Counter Strike, or in his case, League of Legends. “Everybody likes videogames, but for me it was different. I was adamant on what I wanted to do, so I did everything I could until my father bought me a computer, even get perfect grades. When I did it, I started playing and getting inside this world” tells Rodriguez.

        The difference is that he has managed to become the biggest and most mediatic of the around ten Spanish professionals that play what is known as E-sports (digital sports). Ocelote, the nickname he is known worldwide, has become a pioneer that shares the podium in our country with players like Enrique Martínez, alias “Xpeke”, from Murcia also a League of Legends player, Alvar Martín, alias “Araneae” from Mallorca and also a LoL player or Pedro Moreno, alias “LucifroN” on Starcraft II. They are the best payed here.

        “They are professionals on the strict sense of the word that earn a salary from their clubs from playing videogames, like football players”, explains Sergi Mesonero, general director of the Professional Videogame League (Liga Profesional de Videojuegos, LVP). Young people that barely go over 20 years old and generate substantial earnings from sponsors, tournament prices and mainly from streaming their matches through the Internet to their thousand of followers. A trend that makes them earn around 500 euros daily and even more if, like Ocelote they manage to gather over 35.000 followers watching them live or half a million daily.

        South Korea, the Mecca

        However, the professionalization of this sector in Spain has only started. Other countries like the US, Germany, the UK, Sweden and specially South Korea, the mecca of professional gaming are ahead of the curve. This has induced that the few Spanish star player have gone to clubs outside of Spain, where the earn bigger salaries. According to Ángel Guerra, product manager of Turtle Entertainment España and old director of Pain Gaming, one of the few Spanish professional teams, “In our country there is no economic support from companies, although they are getting into it, step by step. We expect this year to have more notoriety”.

        « Traditionally, the biggest salaries have been done in South Korea” tells Mesonero “where we can find annual earnings of over 200.000 dollars, although there have been even bigger cases. In the US, the salaries of the best players are around 80.000 and 160.000 dollars. In Europe quantities are smaller, between 50.000 and 70.000 euros as an annual average. And in Spain the best payed are between 20.000 and 40.000 euros. But on these figures marketing and tournament prices are not included, which in general are bigger”.

        Ocelote has managed to get in this Olympus for videogames , where we can find mythical players like Jonathan Wendel, also known as “Fatality”, who is able to earn a million dollars annually from different sponsors. But Ocelote’s case is exceptional in Spain and in Europe, because more than being a better or worse player, he has created an empire around his marketing image.

        Arguments with the parents

        To get to this point all these players have dedicated many hours on training and had to put up with many arguments with their parents, whom were worried watching them play so many hours in front of the computer. “We argued a lot, because they saw me coming home, do my homework in less than an hour and then play until 22.30 every day. They insisted on making me do different stuff, but they could not say anything because I always had very good marks” remember Ocelote.

        When his parents saw him at 17 years old getting payed by his team to go and compete outside of Spain, in Hannover, and that from there he would earn his first 2.000 euros, they changed their mind. They realized that the boy had a clear purpose and let him have more freedom. From there, He grew as a professional player.

        First, he was on a french team that payed him 500 euros monthly, so he needed his parent permission as an underage boy. For him it was like a dream to get payed for playing videogames, but soon that amount of money was too small. He kept going to tournaments, getting good results and earning people’s respect until SK Gaming, a German team situated as one of the best in the world, signed him when he was 20 years old, with an annual salary of 2.500 euros. “What we earned monthly from the club was not that much in comparison with the 3.000 euros that we earn every month via streaming, plus what we earned on tournament prices, 5.000 more for each one of us every two or three months. We earned a lot of money” tells Rodríguez.

        Having the feet on the ground.

        Despite his youth and the money he earns, he behaves as a nice person, sensible and “with his feet on the ground”. He is sure that “nothing has changed” even though at every tournament his fans don’t let him even go to the bathroom. This phenomenon of the videogame superstar apparently isn’t going to stop. “Luckily my parents have taught me very well and I have never been a spoiled child” he says when talking about his fame.

        Carlos Rodríguez has always been very conscious of where he was getting in and the figure he making of himself inside this new industry. That is why in his last contract revision with SK Gaming he didn’t care when they didn’t raised his salary, but imposed a condition, like if he were Messi or Cristiano Ronaldo, that the team let him have his own sponsors. The first big he signed up with was Digibet in 2011. an important company in the online betting industry. “I knew I was going to earn much more money through this” he adds.

        The money

        With almost shyness, he struggles when talking about the amount of money he earns when people ask him how much he earns right now. Specially now that he has started selling to his followers articles like caps, t-shirts and mouse pads through his own web page.

        “I live very well. Luckily I can give a hand to my family the house, the cars and everything. I am saving a lot because there will be a moment in my life where I’ll stop playing and I’ll have to make investments” he says avoiding the question. Because of the insistence of the reporter, he adds “I don’t know if I should tell. Ok, but please try to put it in a way that doesn’t make me arrogant, because I am truly not… only with the merchandising I easily earn around half a million of euros annually. That is like 70% of the total, because you have to add my salary, what I earn from the tournaments, all the streaming and what I receive from my personal sponsors. But now is time to save up and help my family ” he insists.

        Although he assures he loves this industry and the people that are on it, and that he wants to dedicate his whole life to this, he recognizes that “being a professional player and playing an important match every week is very stressful. You can’t do this all your life”. “The day I wake up and I tell myself I don’t want to play anymore, that I don’t feel hungry for victory, I will not play, even if the next day I have the biggest final. I am happy playing videogames, the rest will come as it will come” he adds, although he repetitively says that it is still too early for retirement, that he still has not won one of the biggest prizes of one million dollars. “But it will come” he says convinced.

  2. Bref, à moins d’être au top, n’espérez pas vraiment pouvoir vivre de votre passion (les souris et les casques ça se mange pas) , surtout que ces mecs là ne restent pas très longtemps à ce niveau.

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